Select Page

Hedgehogs

A cute, spiky, and resilient creature, some call them  pets, others call them pests, and still others call them hedgehogs (and that is their real name). They live around the Mainland of Britain, western and  northern Europe, New Zealand, and Central Asia. But they are also found  in Africa.

 They like to live at the edge of woodland, urban areas, villages, and  parks and gardens. They can adapt to many areas except extensive pine forests, very wet areas, and upland areas.

What they eat

A hedgehog’s main diet is consists of earthworms during the time that they are awake, from April to October.

So, a hedgehog nutrition  plan puts insects at the  top of  the list.

Besides earthworms, hedgehogs like to eat  insects.

They like to eat. Eh…

5

Silver fish….

N

Lantern fish

N

Spratt

N

Mullets

N

Anchovies

N

Cod

N

Sardines….

That can’t be right!!

OH! Sorry! This is for penguins!

This is what hedgehogs mainly eat

in the wild:

N

Invertebrates such as worms, beetles, slugs, caterpillars, millipedes, and earwigs.

N

Small animals such  as baby mice and frogs

N

Hedgehogs may also eat wild berries or apples if they come across them, but they make up a very small part of their diet.

Different types of hedgehogs

There are many types of hedgehogs all over the world, and they are all equally cute and wonderful! Here, we shall learn a little about all these types of hedgehogs.

The European hedgehog

The European hedgehog, also known as the common hedgehog, lives mainly in European countries such as Great Britain, Germany, the Netherlands, and many others. Even though the European hedgehog has a healthy population, it is declining in many countries and has now become endangered. This hedgehog is usually 20–30 centimeters wide and 10 cm long, and they live up to 10 years. The European hedgehog lives mainly near woodland areas. And it has an omnivore diet.

Southern white-breasted hedgehog

The southern white-breasted hedgehog looks quite similar to the European hedgehog, but the southern white-breasted hedgehog has a white spot on its belly, which the European hedgehog does not have. It is found around Eastern Europe (then why is it called a Southern hedgehog?) And it is also found in Western Asia. Unlike most hedgehogs, this one makes its nests from grass and does not dig. There is also another similar hedgehog called the Northern White-Baked Hedgehog.

 

African Pygmy Hedgehog

The African pygmy hedgehog, also known as the four-toed hedgehog, is native to central and eastern Africa. The females are usually larger than the males, and they can grow up to 12 inches long. The pygmy hedgehog is also one of the most popular hedgehogs to keep as pets. Their colors are usually cream or gray. The African Pygmy Hedgehog usually lives from 4-6 years, but some live until 8. But in the wild, they live less due to natural predators, disease, etc.

Algerian hedgehog

The Algerian hedgehog is usually 20–25 cm long and has a long snout and legs so that it can run faster. It usually lives for 3–7 years, but if it is held as a pet, it can live longer. They have black fur on their legs and cream, white, or brown fur on their belly. It can be found from Morocco to Libya in warmer and drier areas. And they weigh up to 650 grams.

Different types of hedgehogs

There are many types of hedgehogs all over the world, and they are all equally cute and wonderful! Here, we shall learn a little about all these types of hedgehogs.

N

Amur

N

Bare-bellied hedgehog

N

Brandt’s hedgie

N

Duarian hedgehog

N

Desert hedgie

N

European hedgie

N

Four-toed hedgie

N

Goalingona forest hedgehog

N

Hugh’s hedgehog

N

Northern white-breasted hedgie

N

Somali hedgie

N

Southern African hedgie

N

Northern white-breasted hedgie

(I named them hedgies for short.)

Even though there are so many types of hedgies, I think we can all agree on one thing: they are all just as cute, wonderful, fascinating, and amazing!

This was part 2 of the hedgehog project!
Make sure to stay tuned in for part three, where we will be discussing “the year of the hedgehog.”.
(I named them hedgies for short.)

Even though there are so many types of hedgies, I think we can all agree on one thing: they are all just as cute, wonderful, fascinating, and amazing!

This was part 2 of the hedgehog project!
Make sure to stay tuned in for part three, where we will be discussing “the year of the hedgehog.”.

Important information!!!!!!!!

After seeing all these cute hedgehog pictures you may think all is well and that all these hedgies are super cute and innocent… But think again!

How to help hedgehogs

Yesterday evening I was playing a game with my parents, and it started storming with thunder, lightning, and a lot of rain. And all of a sudden, we saw a hedgehog running across the garden. I followed it, and I saw it go between some straw bales near our shed. It hid away in there, safe and dry from the rain, and so, of course, I’m really happy to know that there’s a hedgehog living in our garden! But did you know hedgehogs are actually severely endangered? Here are some ways to help these spiky hogs!

Why are they endangered?

  • They don’t have enough places to nest.
  • There aren’t enough places for them to forage for food.
  • Cars driving fast are killing them
  • Pesticides
  • Large arable fields are a hostile place for them and make It hard for them to move about in the landscape 

What can we do to help them?

  1. Make a hedgehog home
  2. Provide food for them.
  3. Make your garden a good, safe space for hedgies to come.
  4. Encourage other people to also help hedgehogs.

 

How do you make a hedgehog home?

Find a nice, calm, and quiet spot in your garden and place some leaves, straw bales, logs, or some compost.
And here are a few links to videos that tell you more about how to make hedgie homes:

Provide food for them

I already wrote about what hedgehogs eat in the wild here. So you can make sure these things are plenty in your garden. Later in this article I will share what you SHOULDN’T feed a hedgehog and what you can give it.